Native American Heritage Month Book List

November is National Native American Heritage Month, a time to celebrate the cultures, accomplishments, and contributions of Native Americans. At Make Way for Books, we recognize, honor, and celebrate the many experiences, cultures, histories, identities, languages, communities, and stories that are a part of diverse Native communities and we celebrate their contributions and value, not just this month but throughout the year. You can find more information about Native American Heritage Month at www.nativeamericanheritagemonth.gov/

Books are mirrors that reflect our own experiences and windows into seeing the lives of others. At Make Way for Books, we work to share books that highlight diverse perspectives and voices; books that celebrate culture, race, and identity; books that build empathy and understanding; and books that empower children to see themselves and others in empowering ways. In honor of Native American Heritage Month, our staff has compiled a list of some of our favorite children’s books that feature stories of and from diverse Native communities, including those written and illustrated by Native authors and illustrators. Our list includes books that are appropriate for sharing with young children from a range of ages birth-10.

 

Amadito and Spider Woman by Lisa Bear Goldman (author) and Amado M. Peña, Jr. (illustrator)

Chosen by Tania Hinojosa, Bilingual Learning Engineer
Find this book at the Pima County Public Library HERE

Recommended age of the reader:
5 – 9 years old

Why do you recommend this book?
I like the authenticity representing the culture of the Sonoran Desert in the colors and illustrations. The heritage portrayed is also faithful to reality, represented in the voices and words of the book.

Why is this a meaningful story to share with children?
It is meaningful to show different cultural perspectives and it also has messages to support emotional development.

 

Cradle Me by Debby Slier
Chosen by Fernando González, Digital Director
Find this book at the Pima County Public Library HERE

Recommended age of the reader:
Infant – Toddler

Why do you recommend this book?
I love that at the end, the book describes which tribe each cradle board comes from, and that the book is also available bilingually in Spanish, Navajo/Diné, and Ojibwe.

Why is this a meaningful story to share with children?
This is a fantastic board book to share with babies and toddlers. It features photographs of babies carried safely and comfortably in cradle boards from different Native American tribes. The photos and text introduce little ones to different emotions, and the book itself is even shaped like a cradle board!

 

Fry Bread: A Native American Family Story by Kevin Noble Maillard (author) and Juana Martinez-Neal (illustrator)
Chosen by Natalia Hoffman, Chief Program Officer
Find this book at the Pima County Public Library HERE

Recommended age of the reader:
All ages, especially 3 – 6 years old

Why do you recommend this book?
Fry Bread centers on a simple routine- preparing food- and how this is a beautiful opportunity to share history, community, family love, resilience, and more. The author uses rich language to help the readers feel, hear, taste, and smell the delicious fry bread. The illustrations are delightful and show the messiness and joy of a family kitchen.

Why is this a meaningful story to share with children?
Fry Bread is meaningful for so many reasons. The story introduces rich vocabulary words like sizzle, heritage, nation, sienna. Children can connect the story with their own experiences cooking and playing in the kitchen with their families. Children and families can see themselves reflected in the pages, and the story foregrounds the history and experiences of native communities.

 

Little You by Richard Van Camp (author) and Julie Flett (illustrator)
Chosen by Julie Fischer, Literacy Coordinator
Find this book at the Pima County Public Library HERE

Recommended age of the reader:
Birth – 3 years old

Why do you recommend this book?
The story shares the love between a child and a parent. The text is simple and can also be sung to the tune of “Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star”.

Why is this a meaningful story to share with children?
I love that the book provides a chance to read or sing aloud while also sharing how much a child is loved.

 

May We Have Enough to Share by Richard Van Camp (author), tea & bannock (photos), and Caroline Blechert (beaded artwork)
Chosen by Melinda Englert, Creative & Communications Officer
Find this book at the Pima County Public Library HERE

Recommended age of the reader:
Birth to 2 years old

Why do you recommend this book?
This is a beautiful board book featuring stunning photos of many different Indigenous families and profound text about love, connection, gratitude, and sharing. While often stories and photographs representing Indigenous Peoples reflect peoples of the past, I love that the photographs in this book represent many different Indigenous families, living in the present, sharing meaningful moments joyfully. I also love the beautiful details inside this book including beaded artwork by Caroline Blechert.

Why is this a meaningful story to share with children?
Babies and very young children love looking at photos of other babies so they would enjoy this board book made for little hands. Alongside these photos, this book includes beautiful words about connection, love, gratitude, sharing, and caring for others – including children, families, and Mother Earth- that are just as meaningful for small children as the adults in their lives.

 

My Heart Fills With Happiness by Monique Gray Smith (author) and Julie Flett (illustrator)
Chosen by Julie Fischer, Literacy Coordinator
Find this book at the Pima County Public Library HERE

Recommended age of the reader:
3 – 6 years old

Why do you recommend this book?
The story encourages children to reflect on the things that make them happy. The examples in the book provide simple everyday experiences that bring joy and happiness.

Why is this a meaningful story to share with children?
The book could serve as a springboard for a wonderful conversation between adults and children about what makes them happy and why.

 

We Are Water Protectors by Carole Lindstrom (author) and Michaela Goade (illustrator)
Chosen by Mandy Becker, Distribution Specialist
Find this book at the Pima County Public Library HERE

Recommended age of the reader:
3 – 7 years old

Why do you recommend this book?
I love the vibrant and colorful illustrations in this book, as well as the empowering message.

Why is this a meaningful story to share with children?
This story helps kids to look at environmental issues through a social justice lens. It celebrates how the stories that different cultures tell connect with the problems our societies face today, and it helps kids to feel inspired and empowered to make positive change. This book also won the Caldecott Medal for excellence in illustration in 2021, making history with the first Native American illustrator to ever win the award!

 

We Sang You Home by Richard Van Camp (author) and Julie Flett (illustrator)
Chosen by Dianette Plácido, Education Director
Find this book at the Pima County Public Library HERE

Recommended age of the reader:
all ages, especially brand-new babies

Why do you recommend this book?
This is a beautiful book celebrating the arrival of a new life. It highlights the wait and anticipation for the new family member and exalts the baby for all they have already contributed to the family even though they are brand new.

Why is this a meaningful story to share with children?
It reminds children that they are valued members of the family. I also love the way it communicates deep respect for the child.

 

You Hold Me Up by Monique Gray Smith (author) and Danielle Daniel (illustrator)
Chosen by Julie Fischer, Literacy Coordinator
Find this book at the Pima County Public Library HERE

Recommended age of the reader:
3 – 6 years old

Why do you recommend this book?
The book encourages children to show love and support for each other and to consider each other’s well-being in their everyday actions.

Why is this a meaningful story to share with children?
The story beautifully shares the importance of building relationships, developing empathy and respect for each other.

 

Additional Recommended Resources

Native American Heritage Month – PBS

Celebrate Native American Heritage – Reading is Fundamental

Native Americans and Indigenous Peoples of North America: Award-Winning Books – Reading Rockets

We’re Still Here: Books to Celebrate Native American Heritage Month – First Book

 

LISTA DE LIBROS DEL MES DE LA HERENCIA NATIVA AMERICANA

Noviembre es el Mes Nacional de la Herencia de los Nativos Americanos, un momento para celebrar las culturas, logros y contribuciones de los Nativos Americanos. En Make Way for Books, reconocemos, honramos y celebramos las muchas experiencias, culturas, historias, identidades, idiomas, comunidades e historias que son parte de diversas comunidades nativas y celebramos sus contribuciones y valores no solo este mes sino a lo largo del año. Puedes encontrar más información sobre el Mes de la Herencia Nativa Americana en www.nativeamericanheritagemonth.gov/

Los libros son espejos que reflejan nuestras propias experiencias y ventanas para ver la vida de los demás. En Make Way for Books, trabajamos para compartir libros que destacan diversas perspectivas y voces; libros que celebran la cultura, la raza y la identidad; libros que fomentan la empatía y la comprensión; y libros que empoderan a los niños para que se vean a sí mismos y a los demás con una visión poderosa. En honor al Mes de la Herencia de los Nativos Americanos, nuestro personal ha compilado una lista de algunos de nuestros libros infantiles favoritos que presentan historias de y para diversas comunidades nativas, incluidas aquellas escritas e ilustradas por autores e ilustradores nativos. Nuestra lista incluye libros que son apropiados para compartir con niños pequeños desde el nacimiento hasta los 10 años.

 

Amadito and Spider Woman de Lisa Bear Goldman (autor) y Amado M. Peña, Jr. (ilustrador)
Elegido por Tania Hinojosa, Ingeniera de Aprendizaje Bilingüe

Edad recomendada del lector:
5-9 años

¿Por qué recomiendas este libro?
Me gusta la autenticidad con que se presenta la cultura del Desierto Sonorense en los colores y las ilustraciones. Las tradiciones retratadas también son fieles a la realidad, representadas en las voces y palabras del libro.

¿Por qué es esta una historia significativa para compartir con los niños?
Es significativo mostrar diferentes perspectivas culturales y también tiene mensajes para apoyar el desarrollo emocional.

 

Acúname de Debby Slier
Elegido por Fernando González, Director Digital

Edad recomendada del lector:
Bebé hasta dos años

¿Por qué recomiendas este libro?
Me encanta que al final, el libro describe de qué tribu proviene cada cuna tablero, y que el libro también está disponible bilingüe en español, navajo/diné y ojibwe.

¿Por qué es esta una historia significativa para compartir con los niños?
Este es un libro de hojas duras de cartón fantástico para compartir con bebés y niños pequeños. Presenta fotografías de bebés transportados de manera segura y cómoda en cunas tablero de diferentes tribus nativas americanas. Las fotos y el texto introducen a los más pequeños a diferentes emociones, ¡y el libro en sí tiene la forma de una cuna tablero!

 

Fry Bread: A Native American Family Story por Kevin Noble Maillard (autor) y Juana Martinez-Neal (ilustradora)
Elegido por Natalia Hoffman, Directora de Programas

Edad recomendada del lector:
Todas las edades, especialmente de 3 a 6 años

¿Por qué recomiendas este libro?
Fry Bread se centra en una rutina simple, preparar comida, y cómo esta es una hermosa oportunidad para compartir la historia, la comunidad, el amor familiar, la resiliencia y más. El autor utiliza un lenguaje rico para ayudar a los lectores a sentir, oír, saborear y oler el delicioso pan frito. Las ilustraciones son encantadoras y muestran el desorden y la alegría de una cocina familiar.

¿Por qué es esta una historia significativa para compartir con los niños?
Fry Bread es significativo por muchas razones. La historia presenta un vocabulario rico en palabras como chisporroteo, herencia, nación, siena. Los niños pueden conectar la historia con sus propias experiencias cocinando y jugando en la cocina con sus familias. Los niños y las familias pueden verse reflejados en las páginas, y la historia pone en primer plano la historia y las experiencias de las comunidades nativas.

 

Tú eres tú de Richard Van Camp (autor) y Julie Flett (ilustradora)
Elegido por Julie Fischer, Coordinadora de Alfabetización
Encuentra este libro en la Biblioteca Pública del Condado de Pima AQUÍ

Edad recomendada del lector:
Nacimiento – 3 años

¿Por qué recomiendas este libro?
La historia comparte el amor entre un niño y un padre. El texto es simple y también se puede cantar con la melodía de ¿Estrellita Dónde Estás? (Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star).

¿Por qué es esta una historia significativa para compartir con los niños?
Me encanta que el libro brinda la oportunidad de leer o cantar en voz alta y al mismo tiempo compartir lo mucho que se ama a un niño.

 

May We Have Enough to Share de Richard Van Camp (autor), tea & bannock (fotos) y Caroline Blechert (obras de arte con cuentas)
Elegido por Melinda Englert, Directora Creativa y de Comunicaciones

Edad recomendada del lector:
Desde el nacimiento hasta los 2 años

¿Por qué recomiendas este libro?
Este es un hermoso libro de hojas duras de cartón con impresionantes fotos de muchas familias indígenas diferentes y un texto profundo sobre el amor, la conexión, la gratitud y el compartir. Si bien a menudo las historias y fotografías que representan a los pueblos indígenas reflejan pueblos del pasado, me encanta que las fotografías de este libro representen a muchas familias indígenas diferentes, que viven en el presente y comparten momentos significativos con alegría. También me encantan los hermosos detalles de este libro, incluidas las ilustraciones con cuentas de Caroline Blechert.

¿Por qué es esta una historia significativa para compartir con los niños?
A los bebés y a los niños muy pequeños les encanta mirar fotos de otros bebés así que van a disfrutar de este libro de cartón hecho para manos pequeñas. Junto a estas fotos, este libro incluye hermosas palabras sobre la conexión, el amor, la gratitud, el compartir y el cuidado de los demás, incluidos los niños, las familias y la Madre Tierra, que son tan importantes para los niños pequeños como para los adultos en sus vidas.

 

Mi Corazón se Llena de Alegría por Monique Gray Smith (autora) y Julie Flett (ilustradora)
Elegido por Julie Fischer, coordinadora de alfabetización
Encuentra este libro en la Biblioteca Pública del Condado de Pima AQUÍ

Edad recomendada del lector:
3 a 6 años

¿Por qué recomiendas este libro?
La historia anima a los niños a reflexionar sobre las cosas que los hacen felices. Los ejemplos del libro brindan experiencias sencillas del día a día que brindan alegría y felicidad.

¿Por qué es esta una historia significativa para compartir con los niños?
El libro podría servir como trampolín para una maravillosa conversación entre adultos y niños sobre qué los hace felices y porqué.

 

Somos Guardianes del Agua por Carole Lindstrom (autora) y Michaela Goade (ilustradora)
Elegido por Mandy Becker, Especialista de Distribución

Edad recomendada del lector:
3 a 7 años

¿Por qué recomiendas este libro?
Me encantan las ilustraciones vibrantes y coloridas de este libro, así como el mensaje de empoderamiento.

¿Por qué es esta una historia significativa para compartir con los niños?
Esta historia ayuda a los niños a ver los problemas ambientales a través de una lente de justicia social. Celebra cómo las historias que cuentan las diferentes culturas se conectan con los problemas que enfrentan nuestras sociedades hoy en día, y ayuda a los niños a sentirse inspirados y empoderados para realizar cambios positivos. Este libro también ganó la Medalla Caldecott por excelencia en ilustración en 2021, ¡hizo historia con el primer ilustrador nativo americano en ganar el premio!

 

We Sang You Home de Richard Van Camp (autor) y Julie Flett (ilustradora)
Elegido por Dianette Plácido, Directora de Educación

Edad recomendada del lector:
Todas las edades, especialmente bebés recién nacidos

¿Por qué recomiendas este libro?
Este es un hermoso libro que celebra la llegada de una nueva vida. Destaca la espera y la anticipación por el nuevo miembro de la familia y exalta al bebé por todo lo que ya ha aportado a pesar de ser un nuevo miembro de la familia.

¿Por qué es esta una historia significativa para compartir con los niños?
Les recuerda a los niños que son miembros valiosos de la familia. También me encanta la forma en que comunica un profundo respeto por la niñez.

 

You Hold Me Up de Monique Gray Smith (autora) y Danielle Daniel (ilustradora)
Elegido por Julie Fischer, Coordinadora de Alfabetización

Edad recomendada del lector:
3 a 6 años

¿Por qué recomiendas este libro?
El libro anima a los niños a mostrarse amor y apoyo mutuos y a considerar el bienestar de los demás en sus acciones diarias.

¿Por qué es esta una historia significativa para compartir con los niños?
La historia comparte maravillosamente la importancia de construir relaciones, desarrollar empatía y respeto mutuo.

 

Recursos adicionales recomendados

Mes de la Herencia Nativa Americana – PBS

Celebra la Herencia Nativa Americana – Reading is Fundamental

Nativos Americanos y Pueblos Indígenas de América del Norte: Libros Premiados – Reading Rockets

Todavía Estamos Aquí: Libros para Celebrar el Mes de la Herencia Nativa Americana – First Book